Showing posts with label Ethics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ethics. Show all posts

Sunday, 12 June 2022

Living With Greater Integrity (Infographic)



20 Ways To Build Better Bonds (Infographic)



Success Blockers: 7 Behaviors That Are Holding You Back From Your Ultimate Success (Infographic)



Forgiveness: 20 Ways To Invite Forgiveness Into Your Life (Infographic)



Monday, 7 February 2022

What Does Respecting Others Mean?


If you are a fan of reading self-help books, you will have read often about how it is important to respect others. Self-help gurus often say that if you want to earn respect, you have to give respect first. You have to make people happy, and then that helps you in earning your own happiness. But, what does it really mean to respect others? Should you do anything it takes to please them, even if that means compromising on your ideals?

 

When people speak about respecting others, it does not actually mean that you have to compromise on your core values in life. What it means is that you should be able to behave with them in the same manner that you would like them to behave with you. You do not have to put your coat down for them on the puddle so that they can walk over it—most likely you do not expect them to do that for you either—but the behavior is shown in the way you talk with people, act with them and deal with them in a general manner.

 

So how do you respect someone who is at a subordinate position to you? Here, respect comes by understanding what they are as humans. You should realize that every person is a human being and that they are subject to their strengths and limitations too. When you accept that, you are respecting them. You are respecting them when you understand that they might have emergencies sometimes too, they may have problems as well, and that they have their needs and aspirations.

 

Respect is subjective. The way you respect your employee will be quite different from the way you respect your father, for instance, and that will again be different from the way you respect the President. Hence, there are times when you have to act in a situational manner.

 

One of the things that you should keep in mind when you are trying to show respect to people is that you have to avoid any kind of offensive actions. They shouldn’t feel offended or threatened by your presence. The best indicator that you are showing respect to someone is when they are comfortable with you being around them. If someone looks forward to meeting you and is happy to interact with you, then most likely you are respecting them in the best way you can.

 

Also, it is very true that respect is a two-way thing. When you respect others, you get respect. This is the truest thing we can say about respect. 

 


Sunday, 6 February 2022

5 Benefits of Being Punctual


Punctuality is a virtue that we learn to incorporate in our lives from our earliest days. It is probably in school that most of us have had the first taste of what punctuality means. We had to reach school at a particular time every day, and every teacher would teach us for a particular amount of time each day and then make way for another teacher to enter. We also learned the importance of time when we had to face those examinations. Students learn how to count days in the most real sense when they start facing their first examinations!

 

These feelings are only reinforced in later life. Of all the virtues that we ever learn, punctuality is developed right at the start of our lives and stays on until the very end. Quite evidently, this is one of the most important virtues that we are supposed to have.

 

Here, we speak of how being punctual can be important to us in various areas of our lives:

 

1.  When we are punctual, we get an early start in whatever we are intending to do. Being early is being better prepared, and there is also the fact that we have more time on our hands. We make sure that we do not miss out on anything when we are punctual, and that definitely enhances the productiveness of whatever it is that we are intending to do.

 

2.  Punctuality is a much-appreciated virtue by others. If you have to meet other people, and you ensure that you are on time, then it is something that everyone really appreciates. No one likes to wait. Put yourself in the shoes of the person who has to wait for someone and you will understand!

 

3.  People who are punctual get more opportunities in life. Consider an example. Suppose that you have to go to a meeting and you are late. In that case, you will just have to go to the meeting and walk off. That doesn’t give you a lot of opportunity to meet people. But, if you were punctual, you could have probably got the chance to speak with people and who know what opportunities could have emerged from all those discussions?

 

4.  People trust you more as well. Your bosses will rely upon you more than others if you are always punctual.

 

5.  By being punctual, you develop an immense opinion of your own self-worth. You will be more contented with yourself. Most importantly, you will be able to put faith in yourself. This helps in improving your own self-esteem.

 

These are the ways in which punctuality can help you. Think about it… if you get all these benefits, your life could certainly make an important turn for the better. 



8 Ways to Create a Better Impression on People


If you are looking for ways in which you can create a positive impression on people, then here are some things that you can look out for. These are simple tricks and tips that can help you impress people in a better way.

 

1.  Work on your gait. The manner in which you approach people matters. Keep your shoulders upright and walk with a slight swagger. This makes people understand that you are a confident personality and they will like to be around you.

 

2.  Try developing a deep voice. Speak slowly, pronounce your words fully. Do not lisp. Do not hem and haw. All these are things that can help in creating that favorable impression on people.

 

3.  Smile when relevant. Do not over smile and do not be stingy with them either. Smile as much as is required, and if there is a joke, do give out a genuine laugh. You do not want people to think that you did not understand a joke.

 

4.  Wear some good perfume, not the cheap kind. Your perfume or deodorant should be unique if possible, not something that can be sensed on a hundred other bodies in the neighborhood.

 

5.    Wear elegant clothes but never overdress. Just wear what you are comfortable in. It does not matter whether what you are wearing is at the height of fashion at the moment or not. But you have to dress in a nice elegant manner that people will like to see.

 

6.  Be informed. A lot of people are impressed by people who can talk about things. When you are informed about things, you become a good conversationalist. So, acquire all kinds of information that you can, about diverse genres. It is good to have a wide playing field here, because there are so many people with so many different kinds of tastes and preferences. It would be ideal to learn for those people who are always moving around with others.

 

7.  Be friendly to others. Exchange a warm smile, a brief handshake or even a kiss if that is appropriate. Speak with everyone. 

 

8.  You should be able to help others when they are in need. However, it is always best to teach someone a profession rather than give them something directly. That means, it is always to give people some beneficial options rather than money itself. 

 

Try these things out. You will find that by implementing these methods, people begin looking upon you in a more favorable manner.



Sunday, 16 January 2022

Honesty Truly Is The Most Honorable Policy


Once you link up with an internet dating service, you are seeking that special someone that you are able to like... even perhaps come to love. That person is looking for a person that they may like or even perhaps love. What you aren’t searching for is a girl who would like your best friend or your thought of what the perfect man looks like or speaks like or thinks like. So, in order to discover the correct person for you... and they are out there... you need to be totally honest with yourself about yourself when authoring the online profile, during the dating procedure and on the far side of that. 

 

The most beneficial way to start writing your profile is to cautiously analyze your past human relationships. What was correct? What was incorrect? What things truly made you like the last person? Which did not? Don’t assume that simply because you despised that the last person you were in a relationship with was so altogether self-absorbed that they couldn’t see anything else, that you’ll be able to overlook that quality this time. You will not. 

 

If you aren’t tall with a killer body to be proud of, don’t claim to be. If you are a barkeeper, don’t claim to be an attorney with a six-figure income. If you are forty going on fifty, don’t pretend to be thirty something.

 

Remember, the theme here is to discover someone who will like you precisely like you are. If you've lied in your profile, the 1st face-to-face meeting will take away all their doubt that you are a prevaricator... and probably a cheat, also. 

 

In conclusion, once you've found a person that you believe may be the one for you, for golly sakes, terminate your membership to the net dating service. After all, you recognize and they recognize that net dating services are specified for those who are looking... not those who have discovered someone or been found.



Internet Dating Safety


Net dating may be amusing. But do not disregard safety and good sense when you attempt to hook up with a partner. At the very minimum, take care in the accompanying areas.

 

Protect Your PC 

 

Take precautions for your equipment and systems prior to you heading out into the Net kingdom. You need to possess a firewall and anti-virus security for your e-mail and for when you explore websites and interact in cyberspace. At the bare minimum, you might need these 2 resolutions that are provided at no charge to home computer users (i.e. not for commercial utilization):

 

Free Anti-Virus Download: AVG Anti-Virus www.grisoft.com 

Free Firewall Download: Zone Alarm www.zonelabs.com 

 

Protect Yourself

 

Look after yourself, as well, by picking out suitable dating web sites. Look for and pick out a reputable net dating service. How? Set out by asking around with acquaintances, neighbors, colleagues and other people you might know who have attempted net dating, and determine which web sites they advocate. In addition, explore “online dating services” and maintain a notebook of their web addresses or site links, the fees, rules and ordinances, complete contact info of each and any additional valuable info that spikes your interest. Then equate each place. Try out only those places on the net where you feel secure. Make sure to keep off the others ones.

 

So, take precautions. Build up your PC – and yourself – with the right tools and knowledge so that you are able to use online dating services for your fun and enjoyment!



Monday, 6 December 2021

Abortion and the Right to Life


Abortion and the Social Contract

 

See the Appendix - Arguments from the Right to Life

 

The issue of abortion is emotionally loaded and this often makes for poor, not thoroughly thought out arguments. The questions: "Is abortion immoral" and "Is abortion a murder" are often confused. The pregnancy (and the resulting foetus) are discussed in terms normally reserved to natural catastrophes (force majeure). At times, the embryo is compared to cancer, a thief, or an invader: after all, they are both growths, clusters of cells. The difference, of course, is that no one contracts cancer willingly (except, to some extent, smokers - but, then they gamble, not contract).

 

When a woman engages in voluntary sex, does not use contraceptives and gets pregnant - one can say that she signed a contract with her foetus. A contract entails the demonstrated existence of a reasonably (and reasonable) free will. If the fulfilment of the obligations in a contract between individuals could be life-threatening - it is fair and safe to assume that no rational free will was involved. No reasonable person would sign or enter such a contract with another person (though most people would sign such contracts with society).

 

Judith Jarvis Thomson argued convincingly ("A Defence of Abortion") that pregnancies that are the result of forced sex (rape being a special case) or which are life threatening should or could, morally, be terminated. Using the transactional language: the contract was not entered to willingly or reasonably and, therefore, is null and void. Any actions which are intended to terminate it and to annul its consequences should be legally and morally permissible.

 

The same goes for a contract which was entered into against the express will of one of the parties and despite all the reasonable measures that the unwilling party adopted to prevent it.  If a mother uses contraceptives in a manner intended to prevent pregnancy, it is as good as saying: "I do not want to sign this contract, I am doing my reasonable best not to sign it, if it is signed - it is contrary to my express will". There is little legal (or moral) doubt that such a contract should be voided.

 

Much more serious problems arise when we study the other party to these implicit agreements: the embryo. To start with, it lacks consciousness (in the sense that is needed for signing an enforceable and valid contract). Can a contract be valid even if one of the "signatories" lacks this sine qua non trait? In the absence of consciousness, there is little point in talking about free will (or rights which depend on sentience). So, is the contract not a contract at all? Does it not reflect the intentions of the parties?

 

The answer is in the negative. The contract between a mother and her foetus is derived from the larger Social Contract. Society - through its apparatuses - stands for the embryo the same way that it represents minors, the mentally retarded, and the insane. Society steps in - and has the recognized right and moral obligation to do so - whenever the powers of the parties to a contract (implicit or explicit) are not balanced. It protects small citizens from big monopolies, the physically weak from the thug, the tiny opposition from the mighty administration, the barely surviving radio station from the claws of the devouring state mechanism. It also has the right and obligation to intervene, intercede and represent the unconscious: this is why euthanasia is absolutely forbidden without the consent of the dying person. There is not much difference between the embryo and the comatose.

 

A typical contract states the rights of the parties. It assumes the existence of parties which are "moral personhoods" or "morally significant persons" - in other words, persons who are holders of rights and can demand from us to respect these rights. Contracts explicitly elaborate some of these rights and leaves others unmentioned because of the presumed existence of the Social Contract. The typical contract assumes that there is a social contract which applies to the parties to the contract and which is universally known and, therefore, implicitly incorporated in every contract. Thus, an explicit contract can deal with the property rights of a certain person, while neglecting to mention that person's rights to life, to free speech, to the enjoyment the fruits of his lawful property and, in general to a happy life.

 

There is little debate that the Mother is a morally significant person and that she is a rights-holder. All born humans are and, more so, all adults above a certain age. But what about the unborn foetus?

 

One approach is that the embryo has no rights until certain conditions are met and only upon their fulfilment is he transformed into a morally significant person ("moral agent"). Opinions differ as to what are the conditions. Rationality, or a morally meaningful and valued life are some of the oft cited criteria. The fallaciousness of this argument is easy to demonstrate: children are irrational - is this a licence to commit infanticide?

 

A second approach says that a person has the right to life because it desires it.

 

But then what about chronic depressives who wish to die - do we have the right to terminate their miserable lives?  The good part of life (and, therefore, the differential and meaningful test) is in the experience itself - not in the desire to experience.

 

Another variant says that a person has the right to life because once his life is terminated - his experiences cease. So, how should we judge the right to life of someone who constantly endures bad experiences (and, as a result, harbors a death wish)? Should he better be "terminated"?

 

Having reviewed the above arguments and counter-arguments, Don Marquis goes on (in "Why Abortion is Immoral", 1989) to offer a sharper and more comprehensive criterion: terminating a life is morally wrong because a person has a future filled with value and meaning, similar to ours.

 

But the whole debate is unnecessary. There is no conflict between the rights of the mother and those of her foetus because there is never a conflict between parties to an agreement. By signing an agreement, the mother gave up some of her rights and limited the others. This is normal practice in contracts: they represent compromises, the optimization (and not the maximization)  of the parties' rights and wishes. The rights of the foetus are an inseparable part of the contract which the mother signed voluntarily and reasonably. They are derived from the mother's behaviour. Getting willingly pregnant (or assuming the risk of getting pregnant by not using contraceptives reasonably) - is the behaviour which validates and ratifies a contract between her and the foetus. Many contracts are by behaviour, rather than by a signed piece of paper. Numerous contracts are verbal or behavioural. These contracts, though implicit, are as binding as any of their written, more explicit, brethren. Legally (and morally) the situation is crystal clear: the mother signed some of her rights away in this contract. Even if she regrets it - she cannot claim her rights back by annulling the contract unilaterally. No contract can be annulled this way - the consent of both parties is required. Many times we realize that we have entered a bad contract, but there is nothing much that we can do about it. These are the rules of the game.

 

Thus the two remaining questions: (a) can this specific contract (pregnancy) be annulled and, if so (b) in which circumstances - can be easily settled using modern contract law. Yes, a contract can be annulled and voided if signed under duress, involuntarily, by incompetent persons (e.g., the insane), or if one of the parties made a reasonable and full scale attempt to prevent its signature, thus expressing its clear will not to sign the contract. It is also terminated or voided if it would be unreasonable to expect one of the parties to see it through. Rape, contraception failure, life threatening situations are all such cases.

 

This could be argued against by saying that, in the case of economic hardship, f or instance, the damage to the mother's future is certain. True, her value- filled, meaningful future is granted - but so is the detrimental effect that the fetus will have on it, once born. This certainty cannot be balanced by the UNCERTAIN value-filled future life of the embryo. Always, preferring an uncertain good to a certain evil is morally wrong.  But surely this is a quantitative matter - not a qualitative one. Certain, limited aspects of the rest of the mother's life will be adversely effected (and can be ameliorated by society's helping hand and intervention) if she does have the baby. The decision not to have it is both qualitatively and qualitatively different. It is to deprive the unborn of all the aspects of all his future life - in which he might well have experienced happiness, values, and meaning.

 

The questions whether the foetus is a Being or a growth of cells, conscious in any manner, or utterly unconscious, able to value his life and to want them - are all but irrelevant. He has the potential to lead a happy, meaningful, value-filled life, similar to ours, very much as a one minute old baby does. The contract between him and his mother is a service provision contract. She provides him with goods and services that he requires in order to materialize his potential. It sounds very much like many other human contracts. And this contract continue well after pregnancy has ended and birth given.

 

Consider education: children do not appreciate its importance or value its potential - still, it is enforced upon them because we, who are capable of those feats, want them to have the tools that they will need in order to develop their potential. In this and many other respects, the human pregnancy continues well into the fourth year of life (physiologically it continues in to the second year of life - see "Born Alien"). Should the location of the pregnancy (in uterus, in vivo) determine its future? If a mother has the right to abort at will, why should the mother be denied her right to terminate the " pregnancy" AFTER the foetus emerges and the pregnancy continues OUTSIDE her womb? Even after birth, the woman's body is the main source of food to the baby and, in any case, she has to endure physical hardship to raise the child. Why not extend the woman's ownership of her body and right to it further in time and space to the post-natal period?

 

Contracts to provide goods and services (always at a personal cost to the provider) are the commonest of contracts. We open a business. We sell a software application, we publish a book - we engage in helping others to materialize their potential. We should always do so willingly and reasonably - otherwise the contracts that we sign will be null and void. But to deny anyone his capacity to materialize his potential and the goods and services that he needs to do so - after a valid contract was entered into - is immoral. To refuse to provide a service or to condition it provision (Mother: " I will provide the goods and services that I agreed to provide to this foetus under this contract only if and when I benefit from such provision") is a violation of the contract and should be penalized. Admittedly, at times we have a right to choose to do the immoral (because it has not been codified as illegal) - but that does not turn it into  moral.

 

Still, not every immoral act involving the termination of life can be classified as murder. Phenomenology is deceiving: the acts look the same (cessation of life functions, the prevention of a future). But murder is the intentional termination of the life of a human who possesses, at the moment of death, a consciousness (and, in most cases, a free will, especially the will not to die). Abortion is the intentional termination of a life which has the potential to develop into a person with consciousness and free will. Philosophically, no identity can be established between potential and actuality. The destruction of paints and cloth is not tantamount (not to say identical) to the destruction of a painting by Van Gogh, made up of these very elements. Paints and cloth are converted to a painting through the intermediary and agency of the Painter. A cluster of cells a human makes only through the agency of Nature. Surely, the destruction of the painting materials constitutes an offence against the Painter. In the same way, the destruction of the foetus constitutes an offence against Nature. But there is no denying that in both cases, no finished product was eliminated. Naturally, this becomes less and less so (the severity of the terminating act increases) as the process of creation advances.

 

Classifying an abortion as murder poses numerous and insurmountable philosophical problems.

 

No one disputes the now common view that the main crime committed in aborting a pregnancy - is a crime against potentialities. If so, what is the philosophical difference between aborting a foetus and destroying a sperm and an egg? These two contain all the information ( = all the potential) and their destruction is philosophically no less grave than the destruction of a foetus. The destruction of an egg and a sperm is even more serious philosophically: the creation of a foetus limits the set of all potentials embedded in the genetic material to the one foetus created. The egg and sperm can be compared to the famous wave function (state vector) in quantum mechanics - the represent millions of potential final states ( = millions of potential embryos and lives). The foetus is the collapse of the wave function: it represents a much more limited set of potentials. If killing an embryo is murder because of the elimination of potentials - how should we consider the intentional elimination of many more potentials through masturbation and contraception?

 

The argument that it is difficult to say which sperm cell will impregnate the egg is not serious. Biologically, it does not matter - they all carry the same genetic content. Moreover, would this counter-argument still hold if, in future, we were be able to identify the chosen one and eliminate only it? In many religions (Catholicism) contraception is murder. In Judaism, masturbation is "the corruption of the seed" and such a serious offence that it is punishable by the strongest religious penalty: eternal ex-communication ("Karet").

 

If abortion is indeed murder how should we resolve the following moral dilemmas and questions (some of them patently absurd):

 

Is a natural abortion the equivalent of manslaughter (through negligence)?

 

Do habits like smoking, drug addiction, vegetarianism - infringe upon the right to life of the embryo? Do they constitute a violation of the contract?

 

Reductio ad absurdum: if, in the far future, research will unequivocally prove that listening to a certain kind of music or entertaining certain thoughts seriously hampers the embryonic development - should we apply censorship to the Mother?

 

Should force majeure clauses be introduced to the Mother-Embryo pregnancy contract? Will they give the mother the right to cancel the contract? Will the embryo have a right to terminate the contract? Should the asymmetry persist: the Mother will have no right to terminate - but the embryo will, or vice versa?

 

Being a rights holder, can the embryo (=the State) litigate against his Mother or Third Parties (the doctor that aborted him, someone who hit his mother and brought about a natural abortion) even after he died?

 

Should anyone who knows about an abortion be considered an accomplice to murder?

 

If abortion is murder - why punish it so mildly? Why is there a debate regarding this question? "Thou shalt not kill" is a natural law, it appears in virtually every legal system. It is easily and immediately identifiable. The fact that abortion does not "enjoy" the same legal and moral treatment says a lot.

 


Appendix - Arguments from the Right to Life

 

I. The Right to Life

 

It is a fundamental principle of most moral theories that all human beings have a right to life. The existence of a right implies obligations or duties of third parties towards the right-holder. One has a right AGAINST other people. The fact that one possesses a certain right - prescribes to others certain obligatory behaviours and proscribes certain acts or omissions. This Janus-like nature of rights and duties as two sides of the same ethical coin - creates great confusion. People often and easily confuse rights and their attendant duties or obligations with the morally decent, or even with the morally permissible. What one MUST do as a result of another's right - should never be confused with one SHOULD or OUGHT to do morally (in the absence of a right).

 

The right to life has eight distinct strains:

 

IA. The right to be brought to life

 

IB. The right to be born

 

IC. The right to have one's life maintained

 

ID. The right not to be killed

 

IE. The right to have one's life saved

 

IF. The right to save one's life (erroneously limited to the right to self-defence)

 

IG. The Right to terminate one's life

 

IH. The right to have one's life terminated

 

IA. The Right to be Brought to Life

 

Only living people have rights. There is a debate whether an egg is a living person - but there can be no doubt that it exists. Its rights - whatever they are - derive from the fact that it exists and that it has the potential to develop life. The right to be brought to life (the right to become or to be) pertains to a yet non-alive entity and, therefore, is null and void. Had this right existed, it would have implied an obligation or duty to give life to the unborn and the not yet conceived. No such duty or obligation exist.

 

IB. The Right to be Born

 

The right to be born crystallizes at the moment of voluntary and intentional fertilization. If a woman knowingly engages in sexual intercourse for the explicit and express purpose of having a child - then the resulting fertilized egg has a right to mature and be born. Furthermore, the born child has all the rights a child has against his parents: food, shelter, emotional nourishment, education, and so on.

 

It is debatable whether such rights of the foetus and, later, of the child, exist if the fertilization was either involuntary (rape) or unintentional ("accidental" pregnancies). It would seem that the foetus has a right to be kept alive outside the mother's womb, if possible. But it is not clear whether it has a right to go on using the mother's body, or resources, or to burden her in any way in order to sustain its own life (see IC below).

 

IC. The Right to have One's Life Maintained

 

Does one have the right to maintain one's life and prolong them at other people's expense? Does one have the right to use other people's bodies, their property, their time, their resources and to deprive them of pleasure, comfort, material possessions, income, or any other thing?

 

The answer is yes and no.

 

No one has a right to sustain his or her life, maintain, or prolong them at another INDIVIDUAL's expense (no matter how minimal and insignificant the sacrifice required is). Still, if a contract has been signed - implicitly or explicitly - between the parties, then such a right may crystallize in the contract and create corresponding duties and obligations, moral, as well as legal.

 

Example:

 

No foetus has a right to sustain its life, maintain, or prolong them at his mother's expense (no matter how minimal and insignificant the sacrifice required of her is). Still, if she signed a contract with the foetus - by knowingly and willingly and intentionally conceiving it - such a right has crystallized and has created corresponding duties and obligations of the mother towards her foetus.

 

On the other hand, everyone has a right to sustain his or her life, maintain, or prolong them at SOCIETY's expense (no matter how major and significant the resources required are). Still, if a contract has been signed - implicitly or explicitly - between the parties, then the abrogation of such a right may crystallize in the contract and create corresponding duties and obligations, moral, as well as legal.

 

Example:

 

Everyone has a right to sustain his or her life, maintain, or prolong them at society's expense. Public hospitals, state pension schemes, and police forces may be required to fulfil society's obligations - but fulfil them it must, no matter how major and significant the resources are. Still, if a person volunteered to join the army and a contract has been signed between the parties, then this right has been thus abrogated and the individual assumed certain duties and obligations, including the duty or obligation to give up his or her life to society.

 

ID. The Right not to be Killed

 

Every person has the right not to be killed unjustly. What constitutes "just killing" is a matter for an ethical calculus in the framework of a social contract.

 

But does A's right not to be killed include the right against third parties that they refrain from enforcing the rights of other people against A? Does A's right not to be killed preclude the righting of wrongs committed by A against others - even if the righting of such wrongs means the killing of A?

 

Not so. There is a moral obligation to right wrongs (to restore the rights of other people). If A maintains or prolongs his life ONLY by violating the rights of others and these other people object to it - then A must be killed if that is the only way to right the wrong and re-assert their rights.

 

IE. The Right to have One's Life Saved

 

There is no such right as there is no corresponding moral obligation or duty to save a life. This "right" is a demonstration of the aforementioned muddle between the morally commendable, desirable and decent ("ought", "should") and the morally obligatory, the result of other people's rights ("must").

 

In some countries, the obligation to save life is legally codified. But while the law of the land may create a LEGAL right and corresponding LEGAL obligations - it does not always or necessarily create a moral or an ethical right and corresponding moral duties and obligations.

 

IF. The Right to Save One's Own Life

 

The right to self-defence is a subset of the more general and all-pervasive right to save one's own life. One has the right to take certain actions or avoid taking certain actions in order to save his or her own life.

 

It is generally accepted that one has the right to kill a pursuer who knowingly and intentionally intends to take one's life. It is debatable, though, whether one has the right to kill an innocent person who unknowingly and unintentionally threatens to take one's life.

 

IG. The Right to Terminate One's Life

 

See "The Murder of Oneself".

 

IH. The Right to Have One's Life Terminated

 

The right to euthanasia, to have one's life terminated at will, is restricted by numerous social, ethical, and legal rules, principles, and considerations. In a nutshell - in many countries in the West one is thought to has a right to have one's life terminated with the help of third parties if one is going to die shortly anyway and if one is going to be tormented and humiliated by great and debilitating agony for the rest of one's remaining life if not helped to die. Of course, for one's wish to be helped to die to be accommodated, one has to be in sound mind and to will one's death knowingly, intentionally, and forcefully.

 

II. Issues in the Calculus of Rights

 

IIA. The Hierarchy of Rights

 

All human cultures have hierarchies of rights. These hierarchies reflect cultural mores and lores and there cannot, therefore, be a universal, or eternal hierarchy.

 

In Western moral systems, the Right to Life supersedes all other rights (including the right to one's body, to comfort, to the avoidance of pain, to property, etc.).

 

Yet, this hierarchical arrangement does not help us to resolve cases in which there is a clash of EQUAL rights (for instance, the conflicting rights to life of two people). One way to decide among equally potent claims is randomly (by flipping a coin, or casting dice). Alternatively, we could add and subtract rights in a somewhat macabre arithmetic. If a mother's life is endangered by the continued existence of a foetus and assuming both of them have a right to life we can decide to kill the foetus by adding to the mother's right to life her right to her own body and thus outweighing the foetus' right to life.

 

IIB. The Difference between Killing and Letting Die

 

There is an assumed difference between killing (taking life) and letting die (not saving a life). This is supported by IE above. While there is a right not to be killed - there is no right to have one's own life saved. Thus, while there is an obligation not to kill - there is no obligation to save a life.

 

IIC. Killing the Innocent

 

Often the continued existence of an innocent person (IP) threatens to take the life of a victim (V). By "innocent" we mean "not guilty" - not responsible for killing V, not intending to kill V, and not knowing that V will be killed due to IP's actions or continued existence.

 

It is simple to decide to kill IP to save V if IP is going to die anyway shortly, and the remaining life of V, if saved, will be much longer than the remaining life of IP, if not killed. All other variants require a calculus of hierarchically weighted rights. (See "Abortion and the Sanctity of Human Life" by Baruch A. Brody).

 

One form of calculus is the utilitarian theory. It calls for the maximization of utility (life, happiness, pleasure). In other words, the life, happiness, or pleasure of the many outweigh the life, happiness, or pleasure of the few. It is morally permissible to kill IP if the lives of two or more people will be saved as a result and there is no other way to save their lives. Despite strong philosophical objections to some of the premises of utilitarian theory - I agree with its practical prescriptions.

 

In this context - the dilemma of killing the innocent - one can also call upon the right to self-defence. Does V have a right to kill IP regardless of any moral calculus of rights? Probably not. One is rarely justified in taking another's life to save one's own. But such behaviour cannot be condemned. Here we have the flip side of the confusion - understandable and perhaps inevitable behaviour (self-defence) is mistaken for a MORAL RIGHT. That most V's would kill IP and that we would all sympathize with V and understand its behaviour does not mean that V had a RIGHT to kill IP. V may have had a right to kill IP - but this right is not automatic, nor is it all-encompassing.

 


Abortion - No Time To Say Goodbye


By devoting yourself to yourself you can get through this.

 

Sadly to say there are times when we have to lose a life to save a life when a decision is made to terminate a pregnancy. An early termination is known as an abortion. There are people who strongly oppose abortions but unfortunately when it is a matter of life or death then there is no argument to fight.

 

Are you left traumatised by feelings of remorse after going through the experience of an abortion or are you hurting on the inside because you had no time to say goodbye to the little one. Then remember heaven is a big place so baby will not be alone. 

 

It is a big decision for any woman to have to make so listen carefully to all the reasons given for why the proposal of an abortion has been suggested. This will help you understand matters better.

 

Having an abortion does not affect you conceiving future babies but it can if you don`t regarding the circumstances on your health issues. 

 

This is the 21st century where so much help and advice is at hand but still the numbers are on the increase with unwanted teen pregnancies. Girls why put yourself through all the pain and heartache that comes with making decisions on abortion - unlike some unfortunate mothers where their choices were zilch.

 

Abortions are legal under 24 weeks in the areas of Scotland England and Wales if agreed upon by two doctors who believe the health of mother could be affected seriously should the pregnancy be allowed to continue to go the full term. 

 

Crucial elements that will be considered by the doctor before finalizing any decision on aborting the pregnancy are major issues like the woman`s mental stability and physical well-being where permanent damage can be done. If there are signs that baby may be born with a serious handicap then this is another reason why a woman may agree to a termination.

 

Remember the earlier you address the situation the easier it is to for any matters to be conducted appropriately for the abortion to take place. However even though the legal system states 24 weeks the sooner the better - this will help ease stress and pressure. Appointments for abortion clinics can tail back to at least two to four weeks.

 

We have two methods of abortion one is the medical abortion- known as the abortion pill. This procedure is carried out in the first 9 weeks of pregnancy and does not engage any surgery. The patient is given a tablet (mifepristone) a second tablet (prostaglandin) is inserted into the vagina approximately 36 to 48 hours later. These two pills can end most pregnancies in about four hours. 

 

The vacuum aspiration - known as the suction is the other method performed in theatre where the woman will undergo a general or local anaesthetic. 

 

The entrance to the womb (cervix) is lightly stretched to permit a tube to pass through. Once the tube is inserted it only takes about 60 seconds to remove by suction. Recovery after surgery in healthy women is not long roughly about an hour (if no complications). 

 

It is common for a woman to experience some discomfort and bleeding for a few days after the abortion. You will be given just as much advice after the abortion as you were before going in for treatment. 

 

If you are trying to come to terms with a loss or about to go through the experience of one then please be strong. 

 

The open wound of heartache heals itself after a matter of time but it is the mental scar that stays with you for ever. Remember not to beat yourself up over the decision you made if it were the right one. How do you know if it was the right decision or not, well that is easy, it was when you realized god was at your side?

 

If mental anguish still prevails, then to help ease your mind body and soul talk with a yoga master. They do not have the cure but they certainly can help sedate your way of thinking in easing any displeasing thoughts that you have.


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