Showing posts with label For Adults. Show all posts
Showing posts with label For Adults. Show all posts

Sunday, 21 August 2022

Risk Factors For Alcoholism


Alcoholism goes by several names, including alcohol dependence, alcohol abuse, and alcohol use disorder. Recently, it’s been diagnosed as a disease that happens when someone drinks so much that their bodies become addicted to consuming alcohol. It becomes a craving they can’t shake off, no matter how much they drink.

 

Then, the more they drink, the more they’re affected by it because it causes chemical changes in the brain. These changes make you feel intense pleasure whenever you get a drink.

 

This acute sense of pleasure makes them drink more often, regardless of the harm it causes. As a result, people who suffer from alcoholism will keep drinking even if it means destroying relationships or losing their jobs. Still, it’s not enough to make them stop drinking.

 

Even though the exact cause is still unknown, certain risk factors for alcoholism can increase a person’s risk of developing this disorder.

 

Take a look.

 

5 Risk Factors for Alcoholism

 

Alcoholism is a complex disorder with many underlying causes. Therefore, the factors that impact one person can be different for someone else. The factors that can increase the risk for alcoholism are called ‘risk factors.’

 

Still, you can have one or more of these risk factors and still not develop a drinking problem. Yet, it does make you more susceptible. So, it pays to be extra careful when you’re around alcohol.

 

Below is a list of the five most common risk factors of this debilitating disease, commonly referred to as alcohol use disorder (AUD).

 

Mental Health Problems

 

According to several studies, anyone suffering from a mental health issue is more at risk for developing any type of addiction, including alcoholism. And it’s not just related to alcohol; it can also be an addiction to drugs, opioids, cigarettes, and even food.

 

A Close Relative with Alcoholism

 

If one of your parents, siblings, or another close relative has alcoholism, this can increase the risk of developing AUD yourself.

 

The main reason is the person’s influence on your genetic make-up. Studies show that there are specific genes that react differently to alcohol than others and may even be more vulnerable to its effects.

 

A second important reason is an alcoholic relative can affect your environment. Whether you realize it or not, growing up around alcoholics can determine whether or not you’ll decide to be swayed to alcohol use later in life.

 

Binge Drinking

 

Binge drinking is when a person drinks excessively in a short amount of time.

 

For men, this is in the range of having more than five drinks in one sitting. As for women, it’s about four or more drinks.

 

This type of risk factor is more common in young adults between the ages of 18 to 34. Coincidently, this is the time when college students are dealing with the pressures of school. Then, they graduate and have to deal with the responsibilities of balancing work and life.


Nevertheless, many people over the age of 34 are also binge drinkers. It happens more often when they’re in an uncomfortable setting and feel an urge to ease their anxiety so they can relax and have a good time.

 

Exceed the Average Weekly Limit

 

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, adult men of the legal drinking age can have two drinks or less per day. For women, it’s one drink or less in a day.

 

Alternatively, men who drink 14 or more drinks per week, or more than five drinks per day, are at a higher risk of suffering alcohol use disorder.

 

At the same time, women who drink more than 7 drinks per week are also more liable to suffer from alcoholism.

 

The number of drinks varies from men and women because of the difference in their body composition. It also takes into account how they metabolize food, with women being more vulnerable to the adverse effects of alcoholic beverages than men.

 

High-Stress Levels

 

Stress is a common risk factor for many addictive substances, as well as dozens of mental and physical health disorders, including alcohol use. Research shows that many cases of alcoholism stem from a high-stress situation related to school, work, money, or relationships.

 

Alcohol acts as a sedative. So, when you’re overly stressed, alcohol becomes the only way to handle your negative emotions, allowing you to de-stress and take your mind off your problems.

 

Yet, if left unchecked, excessive drinking quickly turns into an addiction. And all those feelings stay bottled up, leading to more serious mental health issues, such as the ones mentioned above.

 

To Sum Up

 

If you, or anyone you know, has one or more of these risk factors, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll lead to alcoholism. Yet, it does mean you have to be extra careful anytime alcohol is being served. For example, start by making a conscious choice to limit your alcohol intake.

 

However, if you suspect that you have a drinking problem, then it might be time to seek treatment. There are numerous treatments to choose from, but all are designed with one aim in mind: to help you take your first step towards a better tomorrow.



Saturday, 4 June 2022

5 Places to Find Friends as an Adult


When did everything get so hard? 

 

Somewhere along the way, we grew up. Life started getting bogged down with responsibilities and plans for the future. While much of this is exciting, what happens all too often as we start laying aside our childhood, is we unintentionally put aside our innate ability to make friends easily.

 

Don’t believe me? Think back to when a trip to the playground ended in a ‘new best friend’ after about 20 minutes of sharing the swings with a stranger. Now ask yourself, when is the last time you connected that quickly with someone new?

 

The problem is, adult friendships are crucial, not just to our mental well-being, but to our physical health as well. It’s been proven that having friends leads to less stress, less chance of heart disease, and longer life.

 

But where do we find these new friends? 

 

Try an App

 

Hey!VINA works much like a dating app, but with one very significant difference. Here the goal is to find someone with like interests you may want to befriend. A quick swipe of your finger starts a conversation, leading to a connection and eventually, friendship.

 

Try a Meetup

 

Looking for some fun group activities in your area? Meetup.com is easy to use on your computer, tablet, or phone. Here you search for events of interest to you. You’re then presented with a variety of groups who like to engage in those activities, giving yourself a chance to meet several interesting people at once.

 

Learn Something

 

Signing up for a class allows you to indulge in a new interest at the same time as meeting someone new. Always wanted to cook gourmet dinners? Been thinking about taking flying lessons? Whatever interests you, this is a surefire way to meet new people.

 

Grab a Book

 

Your local library or independent bookstore is a great place to indulge a love of reading while at the same time, getting to know someone new. Book clubs stimulate you intellectually and introduce you to people in the community who share a love for the written word.

 

Take a Walk with a Furry Friend

 

If you have a dog, why not explore more than your own backyard? By taking Fido to your local dog park, you’ll have an opportunity to meet other dog lovers, while at the same time, giving your faithful friend a chance for a little puppy socialization. This is a win all around!

 

Meeting people doesn’t have to be complicated. Opportunities truly are everywhere. So be bold and try something new. You’ll be glad you did!

 


5 Reasons Why Adult Friendships are so Important


Why is it we never put enough emphasis on the important things in life? Are we really that busy?

 

Sadly, we tell ourselves precisely that. In fact, studies have shown we’re not taking the time for friends like we used to. According to a survey taken in the 1980s, the average adult had a minimum of three friends they were close to. Thirty years later, the same study came out with some chilling news. As many as one in four people claim to have no friends at all.

 

Why is it we don’t enjoy adult friendships? Could it be we’ve somehow gotten the idea they’re really not necessary? This is absolutely not the case. In fact, below, you will find five reasons why adult friends are crucial to your life and your good health. 

 

Friends Give Necessary Support

 

We’re not meant to go it alone. We need friends to act as everything from cheerleaders to a shoulder to cry on. 

 

Friends Teach Us How to Act

 

How do we conduct ourselves? If you’re socially awkward, it might be because no one taught you specific social skills critical to success. Friends are where we learn those skills. It’s with friends that we practice, finding out both what’s acceptable and what’s not. What’s more, friends help us get out of the ruts we fall into and challenge us to try social situations we might not otherwise consider.

 

Friends Give Us a Reality Check

 

Who else but a friend is going to tell you when you’re lying to yourself or wandering down the wrong path entirely? This kind of tough love is what keeps us from disaster and guides us away from the pitfalls of life.

 

Couple Friendships Guide Our Own Relationships

 

Not everyone was blessed with parents who modeled good relationship skills. Having “couple friends” is where we form our impressions of how couples in romantic relationships interact. It’s from these relationships we learn how to balance things like work and romance and how to handle the parenting component. Being able to talk to other couples about challenges unique to this kind of relationship also gives a much-needed place to learn.

 

Friendships are Good for Your Health

 

Studies have shown people who sustain healthy friendships live longer and enjoy a better quality of life. People who regularly spend time with friends are shown to adopt healthier lifestyles, experience fewer physical ailments such as heart disease, and have fewer issues with dementia as they age.

 

In short, adult friendships are an important part of your life and worth exploring. Now is not the time to hold back. Get out there, meet people, and discover all that life has to offer. Making time for friendships should be a priority for all adults.

 


6 Tips for Making Friends as an Adult


Who are your friends?

 

A recent survey has determined you might not have a lot of close relationships in your life. In fact, the number of people who claim to have more than three solid friendships in their lives is only 37% or one-third of the population. Even more discouraging is the idea that fully 27% of adults say they have no close relationships at all.

 

Making friends as an adult is a daunting idea. For one thing, we’re swamped. We get caught up on our personal responsibilities and business goals that frequently we don’t make time for a social life outside of loose connections with our children’s friends’ parents and professional networking. Who has the time?

 

Thankfully, you do. It actually takes less time than you think to discover the joy of adult friendships. You can start with these simple tips:

 

Start with the Old

 

Why reinvent the wheel? Instead, ask yourself who your friends used to be. Is it possible you can rekindle some old friendships? In this era of social media, tracking down your best friend from high school is easier than ever. Why not shoot someone a quick message or text to open up the conversation all over again?

 

Become a Listener

 

When in groups of new people, rather than working hard to be the life of the party, why not take a step back? Making a point to actively listen to people makes you more attractive to those around you (everyone loves a listener) and puts you in the position of discovering the things which intrigue you most about the others. It’s a simple way to learn about shared interests, so you can strike up a friendship.

 

Take it to the Next Level

 

Have acquaintances but aren’t quite ready to call them friends yet? Try opening up a little. Being vulnerable forges intimacy with others and deepens the friendship, taking it to the next level. 

 

Stay in Touch

 

Worried about how to hang onto the friends you have? If you want to keep people from falling off the radar and becoming distant, make a point to check in with them once in a while. Send a text, make a call, set up a chance to get together. By checking in, you’re telling the other person they’re important to you and worth your time. A general rule of thumb? Connect about every two weeks.

 

Make a Group

 

Even better? Start putting your friends together in one place by creating a group of friends. There’s nothing more fun than hanging out in a gathering of people who enjoy each other’s company. Start simple, with a lunch date or drinks after work.